In "Data Book 2013: The State of Children in Memphis & Shelby County," The Urban Child Institute explores social and economic conditions affecting optimal brain development for babies ages zero to three, and subsequently outlines critical areas that need improvement. Research findings show that the environment and community in which a child is born and raised contributes greatly to her future well being, while the health and well-being of its children determines a community's future.

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The Urban Child Institute's message—that brain development in children ages 0-3 is critical—is straightforward. It's the dissemination of this message that gets more complicated. Enter the Technology Department.

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2012: Year in Review

History teaches us that there are significant events that are pivotal in shaping our future. In 2012, we believe the seeds were planted here in Memphis that have the power to shape the coming years for our community. It is the year that our message about brain development in early childhood gathered important momentum, took on a sense of urgency, and assumed its place as one of our top priorities in this community.

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The Urban Child Institute this month published its seventh annual "Data Book: The State of Children in Memphis and Shelby County," focused on the forces, trends and factors affecting the healthy brain, social and physical development of children through age 3. The report shows some encouraging statistics regarding formidable issues whose progress seems to stem from community awareness by a variety of providers. 

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Pre-K matters. This simple but profoundly important statement is the title of an infographic on the website of The Urban Child Institute. Pre-K is an investment with high returns. We have known for a while that early education, specifically pre-K, pays off in a student's success in school. Children who have experienced quality pre-K education are less likely to need special education or repeat a grade, and are more likely to graduate from high school and go to college. 

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